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Journal Articles

The Limits of Health and Nutrition Education: Evidence from Three Randomized Controlled Trials in Rural China

Renfu Luo, Yaojiang Shi, Linxiu Zhang, Huiping Zhang, Grant Miller, Alexis Medina, Scott Rozelle
CESifo Economic Studies, 2012 April 1, 2012

In this paper we present new evidence on the impact of health and nutrition information on anemia rates from three large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in rural China. Each RCT studies a different type of health education campaign designed in partnership with the Chinese government to reduce the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia among rural primary school students. These campaigns include single and multiple face-to-face education sessions for parents at their children’s schools as well as dissemination of written health education materials.

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Journal Articles

Behind Before They Begin: The Challenge of Early Childhood Education in Rural China

Renfu Luo, Linxiu Zhang, Chengfang Liu, Scott Rozelle, Brian Sharbono, Jennifer Adams
Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 2012 March 1, 2012

The main goal of this paper is to analyze the factors (access, attendance and quality of preschools) that may be affecting the educational readiness of China’s rural children before they enter the formal school system. Using data from a survey of 80 preschools and 500 households in 6 counties in 3 provinces of China, this paper documents the nature of early childhood education (ECE) services and the educational readiness of children aged 4-5 in rural China. We present evidence that ECE services are seriously deficient.

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Journal Articles

The Effects of Attending Selective College Tiers in China

Prashant Loyalka, Yingquan Song, Jianguo Wei
Social Science Research, 2012 March 1, 2012
We estimate the effects of attending the first versus second-tier of higher education institutions on Chinese students’ at-college and expected post-college outcomes using various quasi-experimental methods such as regression discontinuity, genetic matching, and regression discontinuity controlling for covariates. Overall we find that just attending the first versus second-tier makes little difference in terms of students’ class ranking, net tuition, expected wages, or likelihood of applying for graduate school. The results do show, however, that just attending the first versus second tier makes it less likely that students will get their preferred major choice.
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