Health and Medicine

Health and Medicine

FSI’s researchers assess health and medicine through the lenses of economics, nutrition and politics. They’re studying and influencing public health policies of local and national governments and the roles that corporations and nongovernmental organizations play in providing health care around the world. Scholars look at how governance affects citizens’ health, how children’s health care access affects the aging process and how to improve children’s health in Guatemala and rural China. They want to know what it will take for people to cook more safely and breathe more easily in developing countries.

FSI professors investigate how lifestyles affect health. What good does gardening do for older Americans? What are the benefits of eating organic food or growing genetically modified rice in China? They study cost-effectiveness by examining programs like those aimed at preventing the spread of tuberculosis in Russian prisons. Policies that impact obesity and undernutrition are examined; as are the public health implications of limiting salt in processed foods and the role of smoking among men who work in Chinese factories. FSI health research looks at sweeping domestic policies like the Affordable Care Act and the role of foreign aid in affecting the price of HIV drugs in Africa.

Recent News

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Left-behind children a poignant reminder of the cost of China’s development

May 2018

Researchers from Stanford University, working together with Chinese academics, found a high drop-out rate in rural China.

Reducing tapeworm infection could improve academic performance, reduce poverty, Stanford research suggests

May 2018

A Stanford-led study in China has revealed for the first time high levels of a potentially fatal tapeworm infection among school-age children.

How China Plans to Feed 1.4 Billion Growing Appetites

February 2018

A 2016 McKinsey & Company study found that nearly three-quarters of Chinese customers worry that the food they eat is harmful to their health.

China's Top Economic Risk? Education.

November 2017

Making matters worse are the millions of children in rural areas who are being raised by their extended families.

One in three Chinese children faces an education apocalypse.

September 2017

Glasses askew and gray hair tousled, Scott Rozelle jumps into a corral filled with rubber balls and starts mixing it up with several toddlers.

New York Times: China’s School Dropouts a Growing Concern for Economy in Transition

August 2017

"This is the biggest problem that China faces that no one knows about.

The Economist: In Poor Countries it is Easier Than Ever to See a Medic

August 2017

Following the formulation of the UN’s “sustainable development” goals in 2015, governments worldwide have committed to expanding access to primary care services. Experts believe that primary care...

China’s Rural Children Are Cognitively Delayed, Survey Shows

July 2017

Rural Chinese children have a significant delay in their cognitive development compared with their urban counterparts, researchers have found, which could potentially hinder the country’s economic...

Will Chinese Living Standards Ever Surpass Those in the USA?

February 2017

Possibly the single most important of the tensions stoked up by President Trump is the rivalry between the United States and China.

The Debate Over the Alleged Higher Education Glut in China

February 2017

Hongbin Li, Prashant Loyalka, Scott Rozelle, and Binzhen Wu recently published a piece in the Journal of Economic Perspectives particularly worth flagging.

Bloomberg: China’s Rural Poor Bear the Brunt of the Nation’s Aging Crisis

January 2017

The outlines of China’s demographic challenge are well-known: By 2050 almost 27 percent of the population will be 65 or older, up from around 10 percent in 2015.

Economist: Give Me a Child

October 2016

The Lancet reckons that 43% of under-fives in poor countries, in other words about 250m kids, will fail to meet their “developmental potential” because of avoidable deficiencies in early childhood...

Caixin: Poor Parenting Hinders Development of China's Rural Children, Study Shows

October 2016

Children in rural areas of China suffer from slow cognitive development due to a lack of proper parenting and nutrition, casting a shadow over the future of the country's economy, a Stanford...

The Winners of the Clearly Vision Prize

October 2016

The winners of the Clearly Vision Prize will share cash prizes totalling $250,000 to help them accelerate their progress and move us another step down the road towards a world where everyone can...

Wired: These five startups are getting a share of £200,000 to help battle poor eyesight globally

October 2016

The US-based startup has partnered with eyewear company Luxottica OneSight to help scale eye care to ten million people in China that do not have access to affordable services.

Smart Focus - Franchising a Sustainable Approach for School Eye Health in China

October 2016

The Rural Education Action Program (REAP), an impact-evaluation organization, aims to inform sound education, health and nutrition policy in China.

Incentives key to China’s effort to upgrade higher education, Stanford expert says

August 2016

China can improve its higher education system by introducing incentives for students and teachers so they take learning more seriously, a Stanford professor says.

After the One-Child Policy

August 2016

The sprawling National Health and Family Planning Commission (NHFPC) in China is one of the world’s largest bureaucraies. Its reach spreads from the bustling supercities on China’s eastern seaboard...

NY Times: Weighing the Strengths and Shortcomings of China’s Education System

August 2016

Nothing stirs passions quite like the debate over the Chinese school system.

NY Times: Study Finds Chinese Students Excel in Critical Thinking. Until College.

July 2016

BEIJING — Chinese primary and secondary schools are often derided as grueling, test-driven institutions that churn out students who can recite basic facts but have little capacity for deep...

The Future Foundation of Rural Education

July 2016

Recently, an academic consensus has emerged that China should focus its human capital development in rural areas.

China Abandoned its One-Child Policy - Now it must fix the gulf in education between city and country children

June 2016

Around 8 per cent of rural children in China take college entrance exams, compared with 70 per cent of urban children.

The Economist: The Class Ceiling

June 2016

NO CAR may honk nor lorry rumble near secondary schools on the two days next week when students are taking their university entrance exams, known as gaokao.

Bloomberg: This is How China Prepares for the Big Test

June 2016

Hu Huifeng, an 18-year-old high school senior from China’s Jiangxi province, is on a strict regimen. Seven days a week she rises by 6 a.m.